What’s Happeni...

May in Chicagoland can be taxing on the edible garden. As spring transitions to summer, we experience light frosts, 80+degree days, hailstorms, winds topping 30mph, and rain for days followed by no rain for more than a week. If you think you’re having trouble adjusting your thermostat...

Success with Beans

If you’ve had trouble with bean production, take note! 1. Decide what kind of beans you’d like to eat: String beans: these are typical “green beans or snap beans” and eaten whole in the pod, before the seeds have fully matured inside. They have at least one string per...

GrowUptown News ...

5.4.18 Updates, Workdays and Orientations Hi everyone. We’ve had some delays on sharing info because of last minute issues with the site – sewers, water mains, City Council approvals, you know, the basic stuff. But all that has been settled and work is beginning! As of last week,...

Good Start for Seedl...

Transplanting seedlings can be a bit of a shock for young plants, but you can ease the transition to your garden by keeping them outside, but in their pots for a few days. This hardening-off process will help the seedlings adjust to brighter outdoor light, stronger wind, and temperature...

2018 Plant Sale List...

Join Peterson Garden Project April 21-22 and May 4-6 for our annual Organic Edible Plant Sale geared toward urban and small-space gardeners and offering items you won’t see anywhere else in Chicago. Buy organic plants, seeds, books, tools, compost, fertilizer, and more — everything...

What’s in my g...

Before you start clearing out your plot this spring, make sure you aren’t removing plants you may actually want to keep. After a long winter, herbs like sage and thyme might look dead, but as perennials they should start springing back to life within a few weeks. Here’s a quick...

April in Photos

In April, you welcomed spring (cold as it was), garden opening day, and the first of PGP’s two plant sales! We particularly loved seeing all the little hands getting dirty and helping in the garden. Be sure to tag us on Instagram or Twitter with @petersongarden or #petersongardenproject...

Chives!

Do you have chives in your garden? It’s harvest time! Chives are a member of the onion (allium) family and grow perennially (they come back year-to-year). Often chives are one of the first signs of spring as they can tolerate cold weather and, if you planted them last year,...

Hello Garlic!

Did you plant garlic in your plot last fall and forget? Or did you inherit a plot with some robust “green things” already sprouting up? Don’t pull it! That’s garlic! And it will be ready to harvest later in the summer.         Garlic is typically...

Spring Garden Prep

Whether you’re growing in a raised bed or in the soil, the surface of your garden might look like this is in the spring: Left uncovered throughout the winter, soil can take on a grayish appearance and pebbles may graze the surface. Weeds will start to pop up and the soil level may be a...

Lettuce Explain: A G...

Have you noticed that there are different types of lettuce out there? Lettuce can be grouped into one of several main growth types – looseleaf, bibb (sometimes called boston or butterhead), romaine (cos), batavian (also called summercrisp), and iceberg (crisphead). You may notice leaf...

April Classes &...

Happy spring! The sun is shining, birds are singing, days are getting longer, and we’re ready to get our hands dirty in the gardens–and we know you are, too. There’s a lot to learn and do this month, from planning your edible garden to volunteering at our first workday of...

Feasts of Resistance...

Resistance doesn’t only take the form of protests and marches—it’s in the food we share, the stories we tell, the gardens we grow. Food shapes culture and conflict shapes food—that’s the premise of our Feasts of Resistance class series. In these hand-on cooking classes,...

Seed Starting Tips

If you’ve ever seen a volunteer tomato, dill or squash seedling pop up unexpectedly in your garden plot, you may think that starting seeds is as easy as dropping them in the soil and waiting. And it is – given the right temperature, moisture, soil, and passage of time. But getting...

Starting Onions from...

Although onions may seem like a fairly cheap “staple” vegetable not worthy of a spot in the urban garden, the truth is- they are one of the easiest vegetables to grow. Onions have few pests/diseases in our area and they require little maintenance other than watering to yield...