Part 2: Seed Startin...

If you’ve ever seen a volunteer tomato, dill or squash seedling pop up unexpectedly in your garden plot, you may think that starting seeds is as easy as dropping them in the soil and waiting. And it is – given the right temperature, moisture, soil, and passage of time. But getting...

Part 1: Seed Startin...

Generally we suggest our new gardeners buy transplants the first year and wait until they have a season (or two) under their belts before they tackle seed starting. But if you can’t wait, here’s some real-time info that will help you. What seeds are good to start indoors right...

History Re-eating It...

As you may know, our original garden at Peterson and Campbell was a WW2 Victory Garden. Our name “Peterson Garden” comes from that location. The “Project” part stems from our desire to use the WW2 model to see if it would work in our age. And we learned quickly, at...

Edible Flowers

       If you think the idea of eating flowers is new, think again: you’ve probably been eating them since you were young. A few of our common “vegetables” are actually flowers, and though we usually eat the buds, they’ll bloom if left on the plant.      Broccoli,...

Fearless in 14

PGP is five years old this month… what started as a public lecture and a crazy idea on March 28, 2010 has turned into an amazing, award winning organization impacting lots of people, changing neighborhoods and offering skills that will last lifetimes. This happened because of you…...

Ten Things You Need ...

  All are welcome! Our mission is to teach people to grow their own food. You don’t need any gardening experience to participate Our gardens are short term (2-5 years) on borrowed/unused urban land – we call them Pop-up Victory Gardens PGP is a membership driven organization....

Come Grow With Us!

What is The Peterson Garden Project? The Peterson Garden Project (PGP) is a federal 501c3 not-for-profit organization based in Chicago, Illinois. For more information: www.petersongarden.org Our mission: To recruit, educate and inspire a new generation of home and community gardeners who want...

Fourteen Food Friend...

The news you hear via mainstream media around the food system may be depressing but I can tell you, from the trenches, there are a lot of smart people doing amazing things to change our relationship with food. From supporting local farmers to showing us all how our little bit can help, from...

About Spinach

This week’s lesson: Spinach! Spinach is among the most commonly grown dark leafy green in North America. Originating at least 2,000 years ago in the Middle East, it is a close relative of beets and Swiss chard. This cool season crop can be sown from seed in the spring and again in the...

About Kale

This week’s lesson: Kale! Kale is one of the most versatile greens to grow, as it can be used in anything from stews to salads, in chips, and even smoothies! Kale is a member of the brassica family, and can have different flavors depending on what time of year it is harvested. The...

About Cabbage

This week’s lesson: Cabbage! Cabbage is the oldest and most widely grown of the Brassica family, and is a relative of kale, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts. There are hundreds of varieties of cabbage, including the popular Green, Red, Savoy, Bok Choy, and Napa. Most cabbage heads have...

About Carrots

This week’s lesson: Carrots! Pulling a home-grown carrot out of the ground can feel like opening a present on your birthday. The carrots you find at the grocery store are sorted to all look the same, but in reality, carrots can grow in really interesting and unique shapes. It is fun to...

Sean Carr

We praise the big milestones our gardens go through, and the individuals who helps make them happen! This series of posts is to give shout outs to the unsung heroes that make those milestones happen. JFK said, “One person can make a difference, and everyone should try.” And these people not...

About Potatoes

This week’s lesson: Potatoes! Potatoes, also known as “spuds”, are a staple crop in the Midwest. There are many different varieties, which range in shape and color such as purple, yellow, and orange, and have different flavors and uses. Choosing a variety can be overwhelming, but they...

Emily Fishbein

We praise the big milestones our gardens go through, and the individuals who helps make them happen! This series of posts is to give shout outs to the unsung heroes that make those milestones happen. JFK said, “One person can make a difference, and everyone should try.” And these people not...

About Onions

This week’s lesson: Onions! Onions belong to the lily family, and have been used for food and medicine for thousands of years. They are a very popular crop among gardeners, because they can be stored for a long time after harvesting. Plus, there are over 300 varieties in different...

Chris Braun

We praise the big milestones our gardens go through, and the individuals who helps make them happen! This series of posts is to give shout outs to the unsung heroes that make those milestones happen. JFK said, “One person can make a difference, and everyone should try.” And these people not...

About Corn

This week’s lesson: Corn! America’s beloved, quintessential Midwest crop is believed to have originated in Mexico over 80,000 years ago (called “maize”). Corn, beans, and squash were known as the “three sisters” by Native Americans, because they could be grown as companions; the corn...

Sarah Mallin

We praise the big milestones our gardens go through, and the individuals who helps make them happen! This series of posts is to give shout outs to the unsung heroes that make those milestones happen. JFK said, “One person can make a difference, and everyone should try.” And these people not...

About Eggplant

This week’s lesson: Eggplant! Eggplant is a heat-loving crop native to India, and comes in many shapes, sizes, and colors. Some 18th-century European varieties were yellow or white and resembled goose or hen’s eggs, hence the name “eggplant”. Eggplant is widely used in...

Caitlin Donato

We praise the big milestones our gardens go through, and the individuals who helps make them happen! This series of posts is to give shout outs to the unsung heroes that make those milestones happen. JFK said, “One person can make a difference, and everyone should try.” And these people not...

What You Can Compost...

Traditionally compostables come from your kitchen like leftovers and vegetable ends, rinds and husks, but you can also compost a great deal directly from your garden plot. From the plot you can compost plant roots, stalks, stems, vines and leaves. You can definitely compost pulled weeds and...

About Tomatillos �...

This week’s lesson: Tomatillos & Ground Cherries! Tomatillos and ground cherries both belong to the nightshade family, and although they taste very different, they look very similar. Both fruits grow like paper lanterns, enclosed in an inedible husk. Tomatillos are medium sized,...